Sacred Body: Helping Ourselves

Helping Ourselves - Nang Talinee, the Lao Earth GoddessSuppose… the body is a God in its own right, a teacher, a mentor, a certified guide? Then what? …. Are we strong enough to refute the party line and listen deep, listen true to the body as a powerful and holy being?”

-Clarissa Pinkola Estes (Women Who Run with the Wolves)

Our bodies are a sacred gift that, when cared for, are a vital part of our ability to live life to the fullest and be our truest selves. The body has great intelligence and is capable of profound healing and amazing feats as well as the little things that give us so much pleasure. It will also tell us when something is wrong.

Our job is to listen and respond accordingly.

Developing this relationship with our bodies is a skill that takes practice and support to develop because we are generally taught to do the opposite. The conscious connection between our minds and bodies has, in many cases, been weakened or even severed. We may walk around numb to the signals and signs as well as our emotions and feelings. We often feel guilty when we give priority and take the time to listen to our intuition.

But there is a big difference between thoughtful listening and responding and being selfish.

I find that one of the greatest challenges for us as women is valuing ourselves enough to focus our attention upon our own needs to an effective level.

Our bodies love to be loved and we are each the only person who can ultimately give that love. Movement, fitness, proper breathing, nourishing foods, plenty of water (dehydration is epidemic in this country), and the cultivation of a positive mindset can form the foundation of a healthy lifestyle. This is extremely powerful medicine. It can help us find our strength and balance in these times.

Reclaiming Ancient Feminine Wisdom

In our culture, postpartum is generally considered to be the first 6-8 weeks after giving birth. In some traditional cultures, the mother and baby are secluded, sheltered, protected, and nurtured for the first 40 days postpartum. This is to ensure that the mother’s womb and belly heal properly and that her full health and vigor is restored before she takes on the full-time job of childrearing.

What a humane and logical way to prepare mothers for perhaps the most challenging job they will ever undertake.

But in the modern world, without the family, community, and “village” structures in place, the health of families and often the postpartum mother is “falling through the cracks” of public health. It is alarming to me to see how many mothers have never received any support or education about postnatal recovery, including women with grown children. Many issues will not go away without proper care.

I’m witnessing how women beyond the socially acceptable period of 6-8 weeks, are often ashamed that they couldn’t “get it together and recover” during this short period. Sometimes they just give up or beat themselves up, adding to their sense of being burdened.

The true definition of postpartum is simply “following childbirth or the birth of young.” How can we accept that the term “postpartum” is now automatically synonymous with “depression” in our culture??

Helping Ourselves

I’ve heard many stories of mothers whose health concerns such as diastasis recti (split in the belly muscles), inability to rebuild the core (aka “mommy tummy”), incontinence, constipation, depression, numbness around cesarean scar incision, and birth trauma are disregarded. Without proper education and support, women may not know what solution to pursue, or if a solution exists at all. These issues are often brushed aside, never to be addressed as the demands of parenting take hold. They may last a lifetime, causing further pain and complications.

Finding your voice in the face of being disregarded and owning the fact that you need help or to take action can be the biggest stumbling block. This is exactly why proper postnatal recovery support, education, and services are so important and necessary for mothers at any stage. Whether it’s a network of mothers, women, family, community, and/or women’s health and fitness professionals, mothers deserve to be respected and acknowledged for the priceless contributions they make.

The well-being of our children and our planet ultimately depends on the health of mothers.

Dancing Life to the Beat of Your Own Drum

 

image dancing M2M Nwsltr May 2015

When was the last time you danced because you felt like it? How does it feel when you let yourself dance for no particular reason?

Dance is everywhere in our culture, often organized in classes, performances, and entertainment in the media. Some people don’t like to dance but many eventually love it once they feel safe and less self-conscious. There’s a common belief in our culture that dancing is only for special, highly trained and extra talented individuals. But dance as a natural expression of daily life is in the roots of human culture throughout history and enjoyed globally by all generations.

I dance for the joy of it. I’m happiest when I don’t care what others think, when attention and approval don’t matter. The challenge is to focus on the sheer sense of freedom, release, expression, celebration; like a meditation, stepping inside of the music and the rhythm, allowing it to lead me.

Dancing Life

Dance Walking with a group of fellow sweet souls in downtown Portland, Maine. (Photo by Robyn Wiley, author of “My Happy Book: A Guided Journal to Light Up Your Life”)

Why don’t people dance down the street? I do. Usually by myself. Why is it considered normal to watch others perform, but not move your own body? I was delighted to find dance walking was a “thing”. Have you ever turned up the music and just danced your heart out? How about with your kids or loved ones? How did they respond?

This is a public health issue. Everywhere you look, people are stressed and frazzled; even little children. What is going on? The dangerous foreign invader that we keep missing is the epidemic of fear we’re carrying inside.

What if instead of fighting with themselves and others, people chose to turn up the music and sing or dance? Dancing can also help eliminate depression more than aerobic exercise or listening to music. A recent study in the New England Journal of Medicine considered 11 different physical activities. Researchers found that dancers have a sharper mind and are at a lower risk of developing brain disease in the long term than non-dancers. Dancing was the only activity of the 11 studied that lowered the risk of dementia by at least 76 percent.

I am a dancer. I dance because it comes from and nourishes my soul. I have to dance so I weave dance throughout my life. I make that effort because it made me miserable to deny myself this joy and the happiness of generally being myself.

WHAT DO YOU DO THAT MAKES YOU HAPPY?

Even if it’s just for 5 minutes? It doesn’t matter what it is. Dancing is just an example. Try something different! What have you always wanted to try but felt like you couldn’t because of what others might think?

My point is sSelf Portrait Sept 16 2014imply that we can BE OURSELVES and DO WHAT MAKES US HAPPY in the context of our lives right now.  Hiding your true self and stuffing your truth is sure to make you sick and unhappy. I know because I’ve been there myself and I now know there is another choice.