Postpartum Massage: Recover and Replenish

“Nurture your health, both inside and out.” –Mary Buchan

In general, the first 6-8 weeks are considered the “postpartum” period when the uterus shrinks back to pre-pregnancy size and position. But the recovery process after birth can last for years, especially once the demands of parenting take hold and if there is not a strong support system in place.

Postpartum massage assists mothers in recovery and replenishment after giving birth. Some women are ready for it immediately and others may need several weeks or more. It is important to obtain the go-ahead from your health provider that ypostnatal massage oil candles smallour body is healed enough before receiving massage. It is equally essential to work with a therapist specifically certified in prenatal and postpartum massage.

This form of body work can be a vital part of the healing process as a woman walks through the tremendous transformation that comes with motherhood. It allows for a peaceful time to find balance for the self and meeting the challenges of caring for your little one/s.

The art of postpartum massage can include:

  • reducing pain, soreness, and stiffness
  • stress reduction
  • supporting hormonal balance/regulation
  • reducing swelling
  • assisting the uterus to shrink back to normal size
  • better sleep
  • addressing or prevention of postpartum depression
  • support for resolution of trauma during birth
  • checking for diastasis recti (separation in belly muscles)
  • supportive suggestions for diastasis recti, psoas muscle, and pelvic floor weakness
  • improved breastfeeding as it stimulates release of oxytocin.*

*Oxytocin triggers the milk ejection complex which pushes the milk out of the nipple, making it easier to breastfeed. The more you breastfeed your baby, the more milk you will produce.

C-section scar reduction massage, which includes instruction for self-massage, can help mothers to reconnect with their bellies and their bodies after the impact of surgery. The first 6-14 weeks postpartum is generally considered the ideal time to begin to address the scar tissue, however, only with a doctor or midwife’s approval. But recovery can absolutely still be addressed even years later.

If there was trauma at the birth, it can help soothe the nervous system, support release of painful emotions, and be a powerful therapeutic complement to counseling. We generally cope with trauma by disconnecting from our bodies so massage is a gentle road back to feeling and being present in your body again.

You may have the option to bring your newborn baby to the session. I’ve worked with newborns and mamas on the table together many times. Baby is nestled against mama’s breast in a protective cocoon of propping pillows while we work with the side-lying position. Babies of mothers that received regular pregnancy massage seem to be quite familiar and comfortable back on the massage table. They even seem to recognize and respond positively to my voice!

Therapeutic massage can be a fundamental aspect of the postpartum healing process; it is much more than a pampering luxury. In many traditional cultures, it is an essential aspect of regular care for mothers after childbirth. Healthy, happy mothers mean a healthy, happy society.

The Mysterious Psoas

female-hip“It’s in the reach of my arms, the span of my hips, the stride of my step, the curl of my lips. I’m a woman phenomenally. Phenomenal woman, that’s me.”

-Maya Angelou

Most people haven’t heard of the iliopsoas muscle, generally called the psoas (“so’ az”), much less know where it is. The largest and thickest muscle in the body, the psoas connects our trunk to the legs, connecting along the lower back (T12-L5) and involves movement of the back, pelvis, legs, and indirectly, the arms. It is deeply buried under the abdominal muscles and down into the pelvis. Think of the psoas when you enjoy that swing in your hips!

Two Fascinating Facts:
1. It’s the first muscle that forms in the human fetus.
2. When a woman is giving birth the psoas helps to push the baby out.

It’s quite common for postnatal women to report “pain in the buttocks, sacrum and along the crest of the hips in the back”. This is the path of the psoas so it’s often the culpit when it becomes tight and contracted, including the hip flexors.

AREAS WITH SIGNS OF PAIN:
low back, hips, thighs, abdomen during bowel movements, while standing or hanging, even difficulty breathing

CAUSES INCLUDE:

  • “Sucking” in the tummy (yes, allow your belly to breath!)
  • Over training
  • Sitting too long
  • Poor posture
  • Poor muscle alignment
  • Impact of childbirth
  • Scar tissue adhesions after surgery (including c-section birth)

You might call it a “deep feminine” muscle as it can also hold deeply buried emotions and tension, just like the pelvic floor.  Alexander Lowen, MD, creator of BioEnergetic therapy, wrote: ”There is a bottom to our despair. It is the pelvic floor.” Though it’s not technically a pelvic floor muscle, it is a vital part of the same web of connective tissues (known as “fascia”) and also helps create stability in our core and trunk so one invariably affects the other. As children, many of us learn to tighten our pelvic floor as a way of shutting down or repressing fearful emotions and trauma. This is a common response of “flight or fight” by the nervous system as a coping mechanism.

Other spiritual and emotional solutions may be:

  • grounding with the Earth,
  • monitoring stress levels
  • assessing whether you’re feeling supported or not

Connecting with the psoas can open up painful emotions and memories but on the other side is the healing, reclaiming our freedom of movement, vitality, dreams, creativity, and sexuality.

Standard psoas massage tends to be a harsh, painful, and even shocking experience. Therapists may dig down deep into the area without allowing the tissue layers to warm and melt so the body can open up beforehand.

Though not necessarily comfortable, I practice the approach called “Muscle Swimming”, developed by Peggy Lamb, which is a more thorough and gentle method of systematically locating and releasing the psoas, abdominal, and secondary hip flexor muscles; these all impact the health and alignment of the psoas itself. This can help alleviate stubborn low back and hip pain.

We do a simple assessment first to find out if the psoas is out of alignment and can check after each session to monitor progress.

Bellydance movement is also extremely healing for the psoas and pelvis, back, abdominals, and core in general. As a dance therapist, I incorporate these healing movements and stretches in addition to massage to bring the psoas back into health and alignment.

It’s important to develop a strong core through proper breath work and exercise but rigorous exercise can be dangerous before the psoas is back in basic alignment. Think SAFE and EFFECTIVE exercise. As with all movement, listen to your body and avoid anything that doesn’t feel right (sharp pain, cramping, etc.) Meet your body where it’s at in the moment.

Here are some basic psoas stretches. Remember to breathe…

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Healing After C-Section Birth: Scar Massage

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“To all women who have brought life into the world, to their courage and power. Thank you all.”
-Jane Claire, “C-Section Guide: A Handbook to be Informed, Empowered, Pro-Active”

A C-section is two very important things. First of all, it is birth. C-section birth is also major surgery which requires rehabilitation. Education and support is often lacking in regards to being aware of the potential post-surgery complications. Basic tools for healing and repair beyond “go home and rest” are sorely needed as follow-up to ensure the health and safety of mothers.

C-section surgery cuts through six body layers leaving a scar. The incision cuts the fascia (connective tissue) of the abdominal and pelvic floor muscles, superficial nerves and disrupts the lymphatic flow. As a result, scar tissue forms along the abdomen and uterus.

If you’ve had a C-section, these signs and symptoms may indicate that you’ve developed the bands of internal scar tissue known as adhesions.

  • Generalized pelvic pain or abdominal cramps
  • Sense of pain, tugging or pulling in the abdominal area when you bend forward or sideways, while lifting, leaning, reaching or standing up straight
  • pain, discomfort, or urgency when urinating
  • pain or discomfort with intercourse
  • infertility
  • gas, bloating, diarrhea or constipation (including IBS)
  • low back pain
  • incontinence
  • pelvic organ prolapse

“If not treated, scar tissue can spread in multiple directions. It can also travel up towards the diaphragm and inhibit breathing”.

How Can You Immediately Address Healing After C-Section?

  • rest and recovery
  • avoid doing too much, too soon
  • keep your incision clean
  • avoid lifting anything heavy
  • eat well to support healing

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Scar Tissue Massage as Medicine

With physician clearance post-c-section, women can generally begin scar massage at 6-8 weeks postpartum. Or seek a qualified massage therapist or physical therapist. Gentle, consistent massage for as little as 5 minutes per day is effective. It involves massaging the scar tissue so it becomes softer and more pliable using “three dimensional focus, slowly and gently separating the adhered tissues in all directions.”

Some women don’t want to look at or touch their scar because of pain or numbness. Everyone has different responses; there may be little to no pain, a burning sensation, pain, or emotional release which can include feeling sad, angry, or incredible relief, crying, laughing or any combination of emotions.

Benefits of Scar Tissue Massage

  • softens tissues
  • increases circulation
  • lightens color of the c-section scar
  • reduces “pooch” if caused by fluids trapped by the dam of scar tissue
  • creates a flat, smooth scar
  • stimulates the nerve endings
  • reduces/eliminates numbness
  • increases circulation
  • improve body awareness
  • reduce lumps and chords which may contribute to complications from adhesions (see list above)

Initially, hold below your scar to avoid it opening. The actual scar is much deeper down than what you can see and feel.  Focus on gentle, deep breaths into your belly to help relax the muscle and skin tissues and the nervous system. After you massage for a long time, the scar softens and you can penetrate the abdomen more deeply and help dissolve the deeper levels. To prevent keloids, apply silica strips or gel which will help with discoloration and scar texture on the surface.

Healing After C-Section Birth: Dry Skin Brushing

Healing After C-Section

Dry skin brushing is an effective tool for self-care and recovery after c-section birth. It can increase circulation, remove dead skin, decrease infection, and assist healing by protecting an incision from developing ingrown hairs.

Healing After C-Section dry-skin-brushingBenefits of dry skin brushing include:

  • Moves the lymph which flows down in the deep skin layer.
  • Helps prevent or reduce ingrown hairs on or around the incision.
  • Stimulates the skin’s oil glands maintaining healthy, functional skin.
  • Stimulates circulation which helps remove toxins, tightens the skin, and accelerates healing.
  • Improves the function of the nervous system.
  • Tones the muscles.

LYMPH is a major component of our IMMUNE SYSTEM. In fact, our bodies contain more lymph than blood. Lymph brings our cells nutrients and removes their waste through white blood cells called lymphocytes.

Dry skin brushing moves the LYMPH when it can get clogged with large proteins and particulate matter. Lymph is the only way they can be transported back into the circulatory system. When these proteins are not removed, they attract other fluid which results in swelling. This is called lymphedema.

Consistent skin brushing will reduce and eliminate INGROWN HAIRS around the incision. If not treated, these hairs can create blemishes and lead to more scarring.

The skin is your body’s largest organ and vital to proper ELIMINATION OF WASTE PRODUCTS. If the skin is not maintained, the kidneys will take over this duty and be put under great strain.

Dry skin brushing removes the old top layer of skin, allowing the clean new layer to come to the surface. Our bodies make a new top layer of skin every 24 hours thus producing a softer smoother scar and skin in general. The old, neglected outer layer of skin has been tested and found to contain uric acid, which is highly toxic.

Our skin actually BREATHES when unclogged! It is designed to be a major route of detoxification but cannot function properly when clogged with dead skin cells and the waste excreted through perspiration. Dry skin brushing increases circulation to skin, encouraging our bodies’ natural capacity for discharge of metabolic wastes.

Many women report that their scars feel numb. Dry brushing rejuvenates the nervous system by stimulating nerve endings in the skin. This stimulation causes the individual muscle fibers to activate and move which also helps muscle tone. This benefit greatly contributes to the recovery of the abdominal muscles as well.

The combination of dry skin brushing with daily cesarean scar self-massage (see “Healing After C-Section Birth: Scar Massage”) is a great combination in your toolbox for healing.

C-section birth recovery and postpartum recovery in general, can be a multilayered and sometimes delicate process. Your commitment, consistent effort, patience, and perseverance will pay off! It takes strength to ask for help when you need it.

Remember to have compassion and give yourself major credit for doing the amazing and hard work of being a mother!